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This site is archived and no longer updated as of 13 Jan 2017.
Please visit the new FTS site for the latest data.

NGOs and FTS


What is FTS?
The Financial Tracking Service (FTS) is a global, on-line, real-time database of humanitarian funding needs and international contributions. It serves to improve resource allocation decisions and advocacy, by clearly indicating to what extent populations in crisis receive humanitarian aid, and in what proportion to needs. FTS offers a series of analytical tables that show humanitarian aid flows to specific crises, and also allows users to produce custom tables on demand. It covers all countries for which international humanitarian funding is reported. FTS is managed by OCHA and located at http://ftsarchive.unocha.org.
How can FTS help NGOs?
Publicising proposals: FTS shows not only contributions, but also proposed projects (if they are registered in a Consolidated or Flash Appeal) with their budgets and unfunded balances. NGOs can therefore use FTS to publicise their humanitarian projects and draw attention to funding needs.
NGO visibility: If informed of contributions, FTS can show each NGO’s full effort in a given crisis.
Fundraising: FTS shows major donors to each crisis, including those that have made uncommitted pledges for which NGOs can apply.
Advocacy: Financial tracking provides raw material for advocacy, by identifying crises with the greatest resource needs, highlighting under-funded crises and sectors, monitoring changes in humanitarian resource needs in evolving situations, and tracking the timeliness of donor response to urgent needs. Financial tracking also gives credit where it is due.
Coordination: FTS offers information at a glance on which implementing organizations and donors are working, in which crises and sectors, and to what scale. Such organisations and donors can therefore pool information via FTS.
How can NGOs access FTS?
Online at http://ftsarchive.unocha.org File sizes are small, so downloads are fast even with slow connections. If you cannot download, ask your HQ to download and e-mail it to you. We hope the choices on the home page are selfexplanatory. If not, start by clicking the “help” link.
How can NGOs help FTS?
Share humanitarian project funding information with FTS. FTS depends on appealing agencies (and donors) to provide the raw data.1 FTS is not telepathic: it is a recording service that can only post what is reported to it. Seriously incomplete data undermine the reliability of FTS and its usefulness for advocacy and coordination – and understate NGOs’ full humanitarian efforts. Conversely, full information makes a powerful advocacy tool and helps all stakeholders see the full extent of humanitarian activities and resources in each country.
Inform FTS of errors or omissions: E-mail: fts@un.org
Encourage your headquarters to use FTS and to share project funding information with FTS.
Make suggestions for improving FTS. FTS is always improving to make data more complete and accessible to users. All stakeholders should feel free to suggest improvements. E-mail: fts@un.org.
How can NGOs share project funding information with FTS?
Reporting methods aren't too formal. NGO field offices or HQs can inform FTS of contributions by e-mail (to fts@un.org), fax, letter, via our on-line form (http://ftsarchive.unocha.org, then click the "report a contribution" link at left), or whatever verifiable method you find most convenient. (In some countries where OCHA has an information officer or NGO liaison officer, s/he may facilitate sharing project funding information.) We aim to not cause you any significant extra work. If you are not using our on-line form, we only ask that you specify at least the following:

1. donor country or organization
2. date of contribution (or decision)
3. amount in original currency (e.g. euros, USD), or if in-kind, the amount, description, and value of goods
4. one-line description of the contribution
5. Consolidated Appeal or Flash Appeal project code (if relevant)

If any financing for humanitarian projects came from your NGO’s own private fundraising, or from other non-official sources like the DEC, or unearmarked funds from official donors, please cite that.
FAQ: Doesn’t FTS cover only Appeal contributions or only countries with CAPs?
No—and we have changed our on-line presentation to make it look less that way. The FTS database contains all humanitarian contributions reported by appealing agencies and donors, whether to projects registered or not registered in Appeals, and for countries where there is no Consolidated or Flash Appeal. In 2009, FTS posted more than 9,900 contributions totaling $11.1 billion for 123 countries, from 462 donor governments and organisations, to more than 774 implementing organisations.
Why should NGOs bother to register project proposals in Appeals?
Consolidated and Flash Appeals increass donors’ confidence that appealing agencies’ projects are linked to the humanitarian community’s collective strategy and goals. NGOs and UN agencies alike should perhaps think less in terms of "seeking funding for their proposals through the CAP" (though we would all be pleased if donors decide to fund projects on the basis of their summaries in CA documents, as they sometimes do), and more in terms of registering their proposals—which they will still pursue through their usual funding channels—in the appeal as a way of publicising them and certifying the proposals' coherence with the common humanitarian action plan, and dovetailing with other proposed activities. Inclusive listing of planned projects also helps to publicise the full scale of humanitarian action and resource needs in a given crisis. In 2010, almost 350 NGOs and private organizations registered approximately 1,500 project proposals in Consolidated and Flash Appeals, appealing for a total of $2.1 billion.
How does FTS define humanitarian aid for statistical purposes?
For activities outside of formal Consolidated and Flash Appeals, FTS has let donors and implementing agencies self-define humanitarian activities and contributions. To achieve more consistency, FTS and a working group of the Good Humanitarian Donorship initiative have developed a fairly broad definition to apply in case of doubt. The definition is posted on the FTS website.

SAMPLE OF ORGANISATIONS PARTICIPATING IN CONSOLIDATED APPEALS
AARREC
ACF
ACTED
ADRA
Africare
AMI-France
ARC
ASB
ASI
AVSI
CARE
CARITAS
CEMIR INTERNATIONAL
CESVI
CFA
CHF
CHFI
CISV
CMA
CONCERN
Concern Universal
COOPI
CORDAID
COSV
CRS
CWS
Danchurchaid
DDG
Diakonie Emergency Aid
DRC
EM-DH
FAO
FAR
FHI
Finnchurchaid
French RC
FSD
GAA
GOAL
GTZ
GVC
Handicap International
HealthNet TPO
HELP
HelpAge International
HKI
Horn Relief
HT
Humedica
IA
ILO
IMC
INTERMON
Internews
INTERSOS
IOM
IPHD
IR
IRC
IRD
IRIN
IRW
Islamic RW
JOIN
JRS
LWF
Malaria Consortium
Malteser
Mercy Corps
MDA
MDM
MEDAIR
MENTOR
MERLIN
NCA
NPA
NRC
OCHA
OHCHR
OXFAM
PA (formerly ITDG)
PACT
PAI
Plan
PMU-I
PU
RC/Germany
RCO
Samaritan's Purse
SECADEV
Solidarités
SUDO
TEARFUND
TGH
UMCOR
UNAIDS
UNDP
UNDSS
UNEP
UNESCO
UNFPA
UN-HABITAT
UNHCR
UNICEF
UNIFEM
UNJLC
UNMAS
UNOPS
UNRWA
VIS
WFP
WHO
World Concern
World Relief
WV
ZOA
1 We understand that security or similar concerns in some situations may make it problematic for organisations to publicise their finances.
FTS – PN 301-5, OCHA, Palais des Nations, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
Fax : +41-22-917-0368.
E-mail : fts@un.org

Welcome to the FTS archive!

IMPORTANT: On 23 January 2017, we switched permanently to the new FTS website. The data on this site is no longer updated as of 13 January 2017.

This site is now available only as an archive. The new website contains all the historical data and functionality available here, and its data is regularly updated.

Visit the FTS website (fts.unocha.org).